Is a vegetarian diet actually more healthy than a diet including meat?

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4 Answers

Didge Doo Profile
Didge Doo answered

Certainly Dr Donald Mallard thinks that vegetarianism is the healthiest of diets, but he's more of a medical examiner than a nutritionist.

I enjoy vegetarian foods and, for more than six months, went completely vegetarian. This wasn't from any conviction that it was healthier or more humane, but because I found an interesting vegetarian cookbook and wanted to try it out. I still use some of the recipes occasionally.

Humans are omnivores and our bodies have evolved in a manner that draws much benefit from a mixed diet. Vegetarians, especially Vegans, may find themselves deficient in vitamin B12, for instance.

So when Christmas dinner comes around I'll join with the majority of the population and say, "Make mine meat!"

Woof Woofy Profile
Woof Woofy answered

Seventh-day Adventists are vegetarian and they have a higher life span of an extra 3 to 10 years compared to the general population.

Just because you're a vegetarian doesn't mean you are more healthy... there are vegetarians who eat poor diets filled with junk and soda.

Elise  Stevenson Profile
Elise Stevenson answered

Vegetarian eating has an all-star health rep—but vegetarians
may actually be less healthy than meat eaters, on average.
You may have heard that people claim that people, who don’t eat meat, won’t be
able to get all the required protein they need to build muscle.
They normally go on to express that plant based protein sources are not
complete proteins and do not contain a full amino acid profile, which can be
misleading.

In fact all plant protein sources are completes and do
contain a full amino acid profile. The confusion I believe people come across
is that although, yes, plant protein sources are complete proteins, most is
deficient in at least one of the 9 essential amino acids and
therefore are considered incomplete.
For more details you may contact with a Vegan Personal Trainer.

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